Clinell Barrier Cloths For Continence Care

Cleansing, Moisturising, Anti-bacterial, Antipruritic, Barrier Protection, Deodorising And Soothing
Pack Of 25 Wipes GCCCW25-SGL
£2.68
Case Of 24 Packs Of 25 Wipes GCCCW25
£61.81

Clinell Barrier Cloths provide a unique all-in-one action of cleansing, moisturising, anti-bacterial, antipruritic, barrier protection, deodorising and soothing.

The cloths are quick and easy to use, effectively replacing traditional methods associated with continence care such as; preparing bowls of soap and water, dry wipes, cleansing foams and barrier creams.

Dermatalogically tested, Clinell Barrier Cloths are paraben and lanolin free, containing a patented pH neutral formula with natural plant extracts of witch hazel and camomile which is designed to be very gentle on sensitive skin. (Designed to care for delicate skin.)

The cloths are made from thick high quality spun laced non woven and are available as individual patient packs so as to reduce the risk of cross contamination.

Incontinence associated dermatitis (IAD) is an inflammation that occurs when urine and/or faeces comes into contact with the skin. IAD is a complication of incontinence that compromises skin integrity, predisposes to cutaneous infection and increases the risk of pressure ulcers. Prevention of IAD is based on avoiding or minimising exposure to the skin by the application of a skin protectant. Clinell Barrier Cloths contain 10% barrier cream (4% dimethicone and 6 liquid paraffin) to guard against unwanted moisture and provide that crucial barrier to faeces and urine and hence prevent IAD.

Q: What are the caution statements associated with these products?

For external use only. In case of eye contact, flush thoroughly with water.

Q: What makes Clinell Barrier Cloths better than other continence care wipes currently on the market?

Clinell Barrier Cloths provide an all-in-one action and the formulation contains 10% of barrier cream. This is higher than any other continence wipe on the market and will prevent Incontinence Associated Dermatitis (IAD) which is a major complication of incontinent patients. Soap and water applied with a washcloth has traditionally been considered the ‘gold standard’ for skin hygiene and management. However it is not the most appropriate method for skin care of patients with incontinence. Soap can strip the skin of natural oils and puts it at risk of secondary infection from fungus and bacteria.

Q: Can the cloths be warmed before use?

Yes they can. Place the whole pack of cloths in the warmer and this can be kept in this device indefinitely. The cloths can be used immediately as warm wipes which will increase patients' comfort levels. Please ensure that the cloths are not too hot before using on skin. GAMA can provide hospitals with warmers.

Q: Can the cloths be warmed before use?

Yes they can. Place the whole pack of cloths in the warmer and this can be kept in this device indefinitely. The cloths can be used immediately as warm wipes which will increase patients' comfort levels. Please ensure that the cloths are not too hot before using on skin. GAMA can provide hospitals with warmers.

Q: What products does this wipe replace?

This cloth will replace all other continence care wipes as well as barrier creams, moisturising creams, cleansing foams and dry wipes.

Q: What is Incontinence Associated Dermatitis?

Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is an inflammation of the skin that occurs when urine or stool comes into contact with perineal or perigenital skin. Little research has focused on IAD, resulting in significant gaps in the understanding of its epidemiology, natural history, aetiology, and pathophysiology. A growing number of studies have examined clinical and economic outcomes associated with prevention strategies, but less research exists concerning the efficacy of various treatments. In the clinical and research settings, IAD is often combined with skin damage caused by pressure and shear or related factors, sometimes leading to confusion among clinicians concerning its aetiology and diagnosis.

Q: IAD presents clinically as skin redness with or without blistering, skin erosion or loss of skin barrier function. Skin lesions are characterised by erosion of the epidermis and a macerated appearance of the skin.

Older patients, especially those in long term care facilities, are at increased risk of developing IAD. Its prevalence varies in different studies from 5.6% to 50% and the incidence rates are between 3.4% and 25% depending on the type of setting and population studied. One study reported that around 50% of patients with urinary or faecal incontinence are affected by IAD. Faecal incontinence appears to be more strongly associated with the condition than urinary. Skin breakdown related to incontinence has a considerable effect on patients’ physical and psychological wellbeing.

Q: What is the aetiology of IAD?

The aetiology of IAD is complex and multifactorial. When the skin is exposed to urine, faeces, double incontinence or frequent cleansing, its permeability increases and the barrier function reduces. Increased skin pH can cause it to become more alkaline, increasing the risk of bacterial and fungal colonisation. This can lead to bacterial overgrowth which can cause cutaneous infections. The most common organisms are Candida albicans (from the gastrointestinal tract) and Staphylococcus (from the perineal skin). In addition, friction increases significantly when perineal skin rubs over containment materials, such absorbent pads, or clothing and, bed and chair surfaces. The combination of chemical irritation and friction results in weakened skin. If these mechanisms continually affect the integrity of the skin, IAD and further skin breakdown will develop. Traditionally, IAD has received little attention as a distinct skin disorder and is sometimes confused with superficial pressure ulcers.

Q: Is there any data to support the use of dimethicone?

One study reported a significant reduction of IAD incidence when a skin protectant incorporated into a thick disposable washcloth - active ingredient dimethicone 3% - was used to clean and moisturise the skin of patients with continence problems (Clever et al, 2002).



SKIN:
ButtocksPerineum

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